[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]
[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]
[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]
[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]
[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]
[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

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[Photo: courtesy of Misfits Market]

Misfits Market wants to cut down on $1 trillion in food waste through ugly produce

Melissa Locker

The world wastes a lot of food. Despite the fact that undernutrition is the cause of nearly half of all deaths in children under 5, the world will waste or lose an estimated $1.2 trillion worth of food per year by 2030. That is not just a waste, but a tragedy.

A good chunk of that thrown-away food is produce that is chucked in the bin because it doesn’t look pretty enough. It’s a carrot with two legs, a tomato with a nose, a pear that is shaped like an apple, or some other reason that the produce is not pretty enough to casually post on Instagram as evidence of your clean-living, healthy-eating ways. About one-fifth of produce is trashed simply because it’s unattractive. Americans are particularly bad about skipping over bruised fruit or funny-shaped tomatoes, so much so that some 60 million tons, or $160 billion worth, of fruits and vegetables get thrown away in the United States every year.

Misfits Market is one of a handful of companies working to fight that waste, by buying that misshapen yet totally edible produce and shipping it to eager consumers. Since its founding in September 2018, Misfits Market has rescued more than 2.5 million pounds of certified organic, non-GMO, handpicked produce that would have otherwise gone to waste.

And it just got some serious money to help it expand even more with a $16.5 million Series A round, led by Greenoaks Capital. Misfits will use the money to build a brand-new, state-of-the-art distribution facility in Pennsauken, New Jersey, to help expand its distribution throughout the East Coast. It’s a necessary move since the company just announced that it is expanding its deliveries of misshapen fruit and vegetable boxes to eight new states, for a total of 13.

If you want to sign up for weekly delivery of funny-looking, great-tasting produce, it costs around $20 a week for a small box or $34 for a big box, or you can test the service for either $23.75 or $42.50 as a one-time purchase. All that funny-looking produce will taste even better since you’ll know you’re preventing food waste.